Week 5 Discussion 1: Question-Based Discussion—Team B (Normal Skin/Lymph)

March 8, 2022
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Week 5 Discussion 1: Question-Based Discussion—Team B (Normal Skin/Lymph)

Week 5 Discussion 1: Question-Based Discussion—Team B (Normal Skin/Lymph)

1. B-1: Describe the basic path of the lymphatic circulation. You may use a visual aid to assist you.
2. B-2: Describe the normal functions of the lymph nodes, the thymus gland, the tonsils, and the spleen. What happens when each does not function normally and moves away from homeostasis?
3. B-3: Explain three ways the skin acts as a defense mechanism. For each of these, identify one condition that develops when this defense mechanism fails.
4. B-4: Where are resident or normal skin flora located related to the skin and its appendages? Identify three normal skin flora and discuss their importance to homeostasis.
5. B-5: It is well known that handwashing is critical to preventing the spread of infection. Explain how excessive handwashing may in some cases increase the potential for a bacterial skin infection. Give two examples where this might occur.
6. B-6: Describe the role of sebaceous glands and eccrine glands in maintaining homeostasis within the dermatologic system. For each of these, identify one condition that develops when homeostasis is not maintained.
7. B-7: Describe the structure of a hair follicle, including any gland associated with it. How do these glands promote homeostasis? Week 5 Discussion 1: Question-Based Discussion—Team B (Normal Skin/Lymph)What conditions can develop when homeostasis is not maintained.
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Hey Amanda,
I got my tonsils removed…at 19! Just like you highlighted on, my pediatrician was very hesitant to remove them because she saw them as an important player in my immune response against inhaled or ingested pathogens (Hubert & VanMeter, 2018). But, I have to say, they were definitely more of a hazard than a defender.

Week 5 Discussion 1: Question-Based Discussion—Team B (Normal Skin/Lymph)Expanding on your discussion, tonsils are composed of lymphatic tissue and when compromised by a bacteria or virus can become inflamed known as tonsillitis. It is important to differentiate between bacterial and viral tonsillitis for course of treatment to prevent overuse of antibiotics. Viral causes include the common cold, rhinovirus, coronavirus, Epstein-Barr, rubella, HIV, and so on (Georgalas et al., 2014). Bacterial sources that trigger inflammation include examples like “Group A Streptococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenza” (Anderson & Paterek, 2021). This is also commonly called “strep throat.” Expected signs of tonsillitis include enlarged neck lymph nodes, red and swollen tonsils in the back of the throat, white spots on the tonsils, and a possible fever. Symptoms include pain with swallowing and other cold like symptoms such as runny nose, cough, and body aches (Anderson & Paterek, 2021).
Week 5 Discussion 1: Question-Based Discussion—Team B (Normal Skin/Lymph)For most patients, tonsillitis is caused by a virus and will run its course with at home treatment of rest, hydration, and NSAIDs for relief. In possible bacterial cases, a culture will be obtained to determine the course of antibiotics. In cases like mine, recurrent acute tonsillitis “generally identified as five or more tonsillitis episodes in one year” (Anderson & Paterek, 2021). In my senior of high school into my freshman year of college, I had six occurrences of tonsillitis. Even when they were not inflamed, my tonsils were large at baseline. After finally removing them, the surgeon told my mom that I had some of the most scarred tonsils he had ever seen. While the recovery was one of the worst experiences I have ever had, I definitely do not get sick nearly as often!
Week 5 Discussion 1: Question-Based Discussion—Team B (Normal Skin/Lymph)Resources:
Anderson, J., & Paterek, E. (2021, August 11). Tonsillitis. StatPearls Publishing. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK544342/
Georgalas, C. C., Tolley, N. S., & Narula, P. A. (2014). Tonsillitis. BMJ Clinical Evidence. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4106232/
Hubert, R. J., & VanMeter, K. C. (2018). Gould’s pathophysiology for the health professions. (6th ed.). Elsevier Saunders

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