Nutrition protein blog assignment

March 6, 2022

Nutrition protein blog assignment

Nutrition protein blog assignment

Nutrition protein blog assignment

Protein blog There are many myths about protein. But unlike the myths that carbohydrates and fats are “bad”, the myths about protein commonly involve thinking that protein is “good” – and the more the better. But in nutrition, amount and balance is very important. With all nutrients, intake can be not enough or too much. This activity is to explore protein myths and critically compare them with valid nutrition information Remember that your blog should be about 500-700 words long. You will need 2 valid references (while you may use your book for some of the discussion, you need 2 other valid sources and 1 needs to be a peer reviewed journal article).

To do your blog: After reading the Protein chapter, consider 2 things that you had heard about protein before taking this class that you are now questioning. This could include any topic addressed in the chapter.

Examples are: a person needs to eat meat to get enough protein; protein builds muscle; most meats are mostly protein, etc. Clearly

Nutrition protein blog assignment

Nutrition protein blog assignment

describe what you had heard or thought about the topic that you now question. Summarize the information about the topic that is presented in the book and compare and contrast what you previously thought. Find ONE source of valid information that addresses each topic. Summarize the information from the source. Provide citation to the valid information. This means that you need at least 2 valid references and one needs to be a peer reviewed journal article Important step: Discuss how you will apply the information that you have learned

Proteins are made of amino acids
Proteins are made up of building blocks called amino acids. There are about 20 different amino acids that link together in different combinations. Your body uses them to make new proteins, such as muscle and bone, and other compounds such as enzymes and hormones. It can also use them as an energy source.

Some amino acids can be made by your body – there are 11 of these and they’re known as non-essential amino acids. There are 9 amino acids that your body cannot make, and they are known as essential amino acids. You need to include enough of these in your diet so that your body can function.

Nutritional value of protein
The nutritional value of a protein is measured by the quantity of essential amino acids it contains.

Different foods contain different amounts of essential amino acids. Generally:

Animal products (such as chicken, beef or fish and dairy products) have all of the essential amino acids and are known as ‘complete’ protein (or ideal or high-quality protein).
Soy products, quinoa and the seed of a leafy green called amaranth (consumed in Asia and the Mediterranean) also have all of the essential amino acids.
Plant proteins (beans, lentils, nuts and whole grains) usually lack at least one of the essential amino acids and are considered ‘incomplete’ proteins.
People following a strict vegetarian or vegan diet need to choose a variety of protein sources from a combination of plant foods every day to make sure they get an adequate mix of essential amino acids.

If you follow a vegetarian or vegan diet, as long as you eat a wide variety of foods, you can usually get the protein you need. For example, a meal containing cereals and legumes, such as baked beans on toast, provides all the essential amino acids found in a typical meat dish.

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Protein foods
Some food sources of dietary protein include:

lean meats – beef, lamb, veal, pork, kangaroo
poultry – chicken, turkey, duck, emu, goose, bush birds
fish and seafood – fish, prawns, crab, lobster, mussels, oysters, scallops, clams
eggs
dairy products – milk, yoghurt (especially Greek yoghurt), cheese (especially cottage cheese)
nuts (including nut pastes) and seeds – almonds, pine nuts, walnuts, macadamias, hazelnuts, cashews, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds
legumes and beans – all beans, lentils, chickpeas, split peas, tofu.
Some grain and cereal-based products are also sources of protein, but are generally not as high in protein as meat and meat-alternative products.

How to get your protein needs
Your daily protein needs can easily be met by following the Australian Dietary Guidelines. The Guidelines group foods into 5 different food groups, each of which provide key nutrients.

The 2 main food groups that contribute to protein are the:

‘lean meat and poultry, fish, eggs, tofu, nuts and seeds and legumes/beans’ group
‘milk, yoghurt, cheese and/or alternatives (mostly reduced fat)’ group.
As part of a healthy diet, the Guidelines recommend particular serves per day from each of the 5 food groups.

The human body can’t store protein and will excrete any excess, so the most effective way of meeting your daily protein requirement is to eat small amounts at every meal.

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Posted in nursing by Clarissa