LDR 600 Leadership As A Vocation

March 1, 2022

LDR 600 Leadership As A Vocation

LDR 600 Leadership As A Vocation

LDR 600 Leadership As A Vocation

https://www.allnursingessays.com/ldr-600-leadership-as-a-vocation/

Review “Case 3.1: A Strained Research Team,” located in Chapter 3 of the textbook, Leadership: Theory and Practice. Post a 250-300 word response to the questions located at the end of the case. In your response, be sure to address the strengths and weaknesses of the three-skill approach in this situation.

B

Review “Case 4.1: A Drill Sergeant at First,” located in Chapter 4 of the textbook, Leadership: Theory and Practice. Post a 250-300 word response to the questions located at the end of case. In your response, be sure to address the strengths and weaknesses of the behavioral approach to leadership in this situation.

LDR 600 Week 1 Discussion Question 1

The concept of leadership as a “vocation” greatly distinguishes leadership from a job, career, or what one simply does for a living. A vocation can be thought of as one’s calling. Vocation is often associated with the clergy or missionaries who feel called by a higher power to fulfill a specific purpose. Vocation is also a concept associated with careers like teachers, emergency responders, doctors, or other health care professionals who feel strongly compelled to dedicate their own lives to improving the lives of those whom they serve. Consider your own view of leadership. How does understanding leadership as a vocation inform your understanding of the personal and moral commitments required of leaders? If leadership is not a job, but a calling, what responsibilities do leaders have towards their position, their organization, and their followers?

Resources for Leadership as a Vocation

Textbook

1. Advanced practice nursing: Essential Knowledge for the Profession

Read Chapters 23-27.

2. Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association

Read Chapters 2 and 3.

LDR 600 Leadership As A Vocation

LDR 600 Leadership As A Vocation

Electronic Resource

1. A Nurse’s Guide to the Use of Social Media

Read “A Nurse’s Guide to the Use of Social Media,” located on the NCSBN website as required by LDR 600 Leadership As A Vocation

https://www.ncsbn.org/NCSBN_SocialMedia.pdf

3. Purnell Model for Cultural Competence

Read “Purnell Model for Cultural Competence,” by Purnell, from the Journal of Multicultural Nursing and Health (2005).

https://lopes.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://search.proquest.com.lopes.idm.oclc.org/docview/220301419?accountid=7374

2. Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements

Read “Code of Ethics for Nurses With Interpretive Statements,” located on the American Nurses Association website.

http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/EthicsStandards/CodeofEthicsforNurses/Code-of-Ethics-For-Nurses.html

4. Status of Cultural Competence in Nursing Education: A Literature Review

Read “Status of Cultural Competence in Nursing Education: A Literature Review,” by Grant and Letzring, from the Journal of Multicultural Nursing & Health (2003).

https://lopes.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://search.proquest.com.lopes.idm.oclc.org/docview/220302543?accountid=7374

Click here to ORDER an A++ paper from our Verified MASTERS and DOCTORATE WRITERS: LDR 600 Leadership As A Vocation

e-Library Resource

1. Culture Care Theory: A Proposed Practice Theory Guide for Nurse Practitioners in Primary Care Settings

Read “Culture Care Theory: A Proposed Practice Theory Guide for Nurse Practitioners in Primary Care Settings,” by McFarland and Eipperle, from Contemporary Nurse (2008).

https://lopes.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://search.proquest.com.lopes.idm.oclc.org/docview/203172654?accountid=7374

2. Defining End of Life Care from Perspectives of Nursing Ethics as in LDR 600 Leadership As A Vocation

Read “Defining End of Life Care from Perspectives of Nursing Ethics,” by Izumi, Nagae, Sakurai, and Imamura, from Nurse Ethics (2012).

https://lopes.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=82506601&site=ehost-live&scope=site

3. Developing Ethical Skills: From Sensitivity to Action

Read “Developing Ethical Skills: From Sensitivity to Action,” by Robichaux, from Critical Care Nurse (2012).

https://www.google.com/

https://lopes.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=74306541&site=ehost-live&scope=site

4. Interventions to Improve Cultural Competency in Healthcare: A Systematic Review of Reviews

Read “Interventions to Improve Cultural Competency in Healthcare: A Systematic Review of Reviews,” byTruong, Paradies and Priest, from BCM Health Services Research (2014).

https://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1472-6963-14-99

5. Moral Courage and the Nurse Leader

Read “Moral Courage and the Nurse Leader,” by Edmonson, from OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing (2010).

https://lopes.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=56593216&site=ehost-live&scope=site

Website

1. ANA’s Social Networking Principles Toolkit

Explore the Social Networking Principles Toolkit page of the ANA website.

http://www.nursingworld.org/socialnetworkingtoolkit.aspx

2. Cultural Profiles of Countries

Explore the “The World Factbook” website.

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/

3. Diversity Rx

Explore the Diversity Rx website.

http://www.DiversityRx.org

4. MinorityNurse.com: The Career and Education Resource for Minority Nursing Professionals, Students, and Faculty

Explore the MinorityNurse.com: The Career and Education Resource for Minority Nursing Professionals, Students, and Faculty website.

Leadership as a “vocation” distinguishes itself from a job, profession, or what one does for a living in a significant way. One’s calling might be viewed of as one’s vocation. Vocation is frequently associated with clergy or missionaries who believe they have been called by a higher power to carry out a certain task. Teachers, emergency responders, doctors, and other health care professionals who feel strongly driven to dedicate their own life to improving the lives of those they serve are examples of vocation. Take a look at how you see yourself as a leader. What does your notion of leadership as a vocation tell you about the personal and moral commitments that leaders must make? What duties do leaders have towards their position, their organization, and their followers if leadership is a calling rather than a job? The first question is:

Reply as follows:

When compared to being a nursing supervisor, a unit director, or a CEO, it’s difficult to classify leadership as a profession. When I think of leadership as a vocation, I think of a politician or someone aspiring to be President. Vocation, or a sense of fit for a certain career/profession, comes to mind. When it comes to leadership, I have to acknowledge that there is a stigma in my department. Being a nurse supervisor or director is a demanding job that can lead to a variety of difficult scenarios that most people attempt to avoid by seeking simplicity in their lives. I see myself as an outlier, and I consider leadership to be a calling. As a nurse leader, I am passionate about bringing the best for the department, employees, and organization by developing, implementing, and building relationships.

 

Because of what Northouse teaches, leadership is linked to being a vocation. Leadership is more than a quality or a characteristic; it is an engaged and dynamic individual who initiates interactions and communication with followers to bring them into a linked connection (Northouse, 2016). Many people struggle to realize and acknowledge the burden that comes with being a leader. Being a leader entails communicating, being inspirational, understanding how to assign chores, becoming focused and determined, bringing in creativity/innovation, and actually being accountable for people that follow you. A supervisory title merely indicates that an individual is a leader on paper. To be one in person and for others, one must possess and desire all of the attributes mentioned. There will be failure if one does not desire to do what the role of leadership entails. Failure is not only for the leader, but also for those who follow.

PLACE THIS ORDER OR A SIMILAR ORDER WITH ALL NURSING ESSAYS TODAY AND GET AN AMAZING DISCOUNT  ordernowcc-blue
Posted in nursing by Clarissa