Assignment: Evidence-Based Practice Project Evaluation of Literature Table

March 8, 2022
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Assignment: Evidence-Based Practice Project Evaluation of Literature Table

Assignment: Evidence-Based Practice Project Evaluation of Literature Table

https://allnursingessays.com/nur-550-evidence-based-practice-project-evaluation-of-literature-table/

Literature Evaluation Table

Learner Name:

PICOT


Author, Journal (Peer-Reviewed), and Permalink or Working Link to Access Article 
Article Title and Year Published

 

Research Questions/ Hypothesis, and Purpose/Aim of Study

 

Design (Quantitative, Qualitative, or other)

 

Setting/Sample

 

Methods: Intervention/ Instruments

 

Analysis/Data Collection

 

Outcomes/Key Findings

 

Recommendations

 

Explanation of How the Article Supports Your Proposed EBP Practice Project Proposal
Lin et al., Journal of Pediatric Nursing,  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pedn.2020.07.003

Effects of Parental Education on Screen Time, Sleep Disturbances, and Psychosocial Adaptation Among Asian Preschoolers: A Randomized Controlled Study

2021

Parental education and instruction manuals play an instrumental role in reducing screen time among children. The study investigated the effect of parental educational program on screen use, sleep quality, and psychosocial adaptation among preschoolers. Quantitative- it is an observational study. The study was conducted in Chiayi, Taiwan from April to December 2018. 129 parent-child dyads participated in the study. The experimental group (N=63 dyads) received parental education and the control group (N=66) performed daily activities. Data was collected before and after the intervention and a liner mixed-model analysis conducted to examine the intervention’s efficacy. The screen time in the intervention group was significantly reduced and they presented improved sleep quality and attention score for psychosocial adaptation. Parental education was recommended as an effective intervention for reducing screen time and improving sleep quality and attention among preschoolers. The study supports the EBP project proposal by confirming the critical role of educational interventions in reducing screen time.
Joseph et al., Global Pediatric Health,  https://doi.org/10.1177%2F2333794X19865856

Young Children’s Screen Time and Physical Activity: Perspectives of Parents and Early Care and Education Center Providers

2019

Caregivers’ lack of awareness of physical activity and screen time guidelines affects their participation in promoting behaviors that reduce childhood obesity.

The study investigated how early care and education providers and parents can facilitate physical activity and reduce screen time in children, with particular attention on preschoolers.

Qualitative- conducted focus groups and thematic analysis. The research was conducted in ECE centers of a selected parish of a southeastern US state. 28 caregivers participated in the study.  Four focus groups were conducted (3 parent and 1 ECE provider) Demographics, accelerometry data, and screen time habits of children were collected at home and ECE centers before and after implementing new guidelines. The groups differed in their view regarding screen time as an entertainment or educational tool and the time limit appropriate for children. Parents and ECE providers were found to lack awareness of physical activity or screen time guidelines. The research recommended the need for improved awareness on screen time and physical activity guidelines. It also recommends investigation into opportunities to utilize screen time effectively. The qualitative research supports the EBP project proposal by showing the need for increasing awareness in parents regarding screen time and physical activity guidelines.
Sheila et al., International Journal of Behavior Nutrition and Physical Activity, https://dx.doi.org/10.1186%2Fs12966-019-0788-3

Parental influences on screen time and weight status among preschool children from Brazil: a cross-sectional study.

2019

The study hypothesized that parental attributes and parental screen time behaviors proportionately affect preschoolers’ screen time and weight status. The study examined the relationships between parental screen time, parental self-efficacy to limit screen time, child screen time and child BMI in preschool-aged children. It is quantitative design since it is a cross-sectional study. The study took place in seven Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) centers in Caruaru – Pernambuco, Brazil.

318 parent-child dyads participated in the study.

The 318 parent-child dyads who participated in the study completed a survey measuring sociodemographic data, weekday and weekend screen time, and parental self-efficacy for limiting screen time. Height and weight were collected using standardized WHO measurement procedures. Observed variable path analysis was used to evaluate the relationships between the parental and child variables. Greater child screen time was associated with higher child BMI percentile. Parental screen time and self-efficacy to limit screen time emerged as influences towards child screen time and weight status. Parents should understand the need to reduce screen time. Reducing parental screen time and increasing parental confidence to limit screen time may be effective strategy to prevent overweight. The study supports the proposed EBP project by confirming the role of parental knowledge in modeling children’s behavior. It advocates for the need to increase parents knowledge to enable them regulate self- and children’s screen time to reduce overweight problems.
Pearson et al., BMC Public Health, https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-020-8232-9

Reducing screen-time and unhealthy snacking in 9–11 year old children: the Kids FIRST pilot randomized controlled trial.

2020

The study hypothesized that increasing parent-and home-focused interventions can change multiple health behaviors in children. The study evaluated the effectiveness of the Kids FIRST project, a randomized controlled trial to reduce screen time and unhealthy snacking. Quantitative- a randomized controlled trial. The Kids FIRST program was family based with a school component in East Midlands region of the United Kingdom.

Children- 407, parents- 75, in 4 schools.

The randomized controlled trial to reduce screen time and unhealthy snacking had pre- and post-intervention assessments. Baseline and post-intervention data was compared. Children and parents reported (full questionnaire data) their own screen-time behaviors as children went further to report snacking behaviors. Descriptive analysis was undertaken intending to treat. Reductions in children’s school day and weekend day TV viewing and computer game use were associated with healthy behaviors in children. The study recommended more parental engagement in controlling screen time and unhealthy snacking as a parent- and home-focused intervention to promote healthy behaviors in children. The study supports the EBP project proposal by recommending the need for more parental engagement in regulating children behavior in early stages. Educating parents will enable them to embrace this role to become more active in regulating screen time as a home-focused intervention to reduce childhood obesity.
Tester et al., Pediatrics, https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2017-3228

Characteristics of Children 2 to 5 Years of Age With Severe Obesity

2018

Children with severe obesity have not been extensively described and more than the recommended screen time limit is a trigger of severe obesity. Quantitative design- the study classifies and evaluates sociodemographic data, birth characteristics, and screen time, among other factors. Children from NHANES, a complex, multistage probability cross-sectional sample designed to be representative of the US civilian, non-institutionalized population, participated.

N= 7028

Children were classified as having normal weight, overweight, obesity, or severe obesity (SO) and sociodemographics, birth characteristics, screen time, total energy, and Healthy Eating Index 2010 scores evaluated. Height and weight were measured by trained personnel at the MEC by using standardized protocols.

From 2001 to 2014, scree time limit was evaluated by asking about average hours per day “over the past 30 days.”

Children with SO had higher odds of screen time above the limit. Children with SO have greater disparities in social determinants of health and more than twice as likely to engage in double the recommended screen time limit. Children should be more knowledgeable about the connection between obesity and screen time. The study supports the EBP project by supporting the need for increasing children’s knowledge on the connection between screen time and obesity. The EBP project looks forward to educating parents and children on reducing screen time and increasing physical activity.
Schwarzfischer et al., Plos One, https://dx.doi.org/10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0229708

Effects of screen time and playing outside on anthropometric measures in preschool aged children

2020

Excessive screen time is a risk factor of overweight irrespective of the time children spend playing outside. The study investigated the relationship between average time spent playing outside and screen time and anthropometric measures. Quantitative- the study is an annual assessment of children through questionnaires. Children of the European Childhood Obesity Project (CHOP) participated in the study.

N= 526

Annual assessments were done through questionnaires. Body weight, waist circumference, and height were measured at 3 and 6 years to calculate Body-Mass-Index z-Scores (zBMI) and waist-to-height ratio (WTH). Researchers performed liner, logistic, and quantile regressions to test the effect of average time spent on playing outside and screen time on anthropometric measures. Excessive screen time in early years is a risk factor for increased zBMI irrespective of the time children spend playing outside. Screen time reduction in early years is critical to preventing childhood obesity. The study supports the EBP project proposal by affirming the need for interventions that reduces screen time in children. It confirms that physical activity should be supplemented with other methods to reduce childhood obesity.
Wernberg et al., Journal of Clinical Medicine,  https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10040795

Screen Time and Parents’ Education Level Are Associated with Poor Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet in Spanish Children and Adolescents: The PASOS Study.

2021

 

A greater amount of screen time and low parental education level adversely affects adherence to healthy diet intake increasing risk to childhood obesity. The study evaluated the connection between screen time and parents’ education levels with adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern. Quantitative design- a cross-sectional study of health approaches and risks. The research was done in a representative sample of the Spanish population aged 8 to 16 years across 17 regions. The analysis included 3333 children and adolescents. Randomization of the participants was performed through multistage sampling procedure to determine physical activity, sedentarism, lifestyle factors, and weight status. Data on daily screen time, diet adherence, physical activity, and education levels was gathered via questionnaires. High screen time was associated with low adherence to healthy diet and the situation was worse among parents with low education levels. Improving parents’ knowledge can improve children’s adherence to healthy eating and physical activity and reduce screen time as interventions to reduce childhood obesity. The study supports the EBP project proposal since it confirms the critical role of parents in regulating children’s behavior and how knowledge affects decisions related to screen time, diets, and physical activity.
Oli et al., Plus One,  https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0200329

Knowledge, attitude and practice on diet and physical activity among mothers with young children in the Jhaukhel-Duwakot Health Demographic Surveillance Site, Nepal

2018

Health education interventions can improve mothers’ and children’s knowledge, attitude, and practice to improve cardiovascular health. The study assessed the needs of mothers concerning cardiovascular health, with particular attention on diet, physical activity, and baseline for future intervention. Qualitative- interviews are used to gather information. The research was done at Jhaukhel-Duwakot Health Demographic Surveillance Site (JD-HDSS), located near the capital Kathmandu, Nepal.

962 mothers of children aged 1-7 years participated.

Nine trained enumerators interviewed mothers in August-November 2014. Responses on dietary and physical activity knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) were scored and categorized based on percentages. The research found that 57% mothers had good knowledge but required improvement, 44.6% had good attitude and 90% poor practice. Perceived Barriers included attitude towards physical activity, lack of leisure time, and lack of knowledge regarding healthy practices. As a result, health education was necessary in promoting healthy lifestyle. Health care providers should consider health education interventions to improve healthy lifestyles among mothers and children to improve knowledge, attitudes, and practices. The study supports the EBP project proposal by confirming the importance of health education interventions in improving mother’s and children’s knowledge. The EBP project proposes educating mothers and children on reducing screen time and increasing physical activity and the primary theme is addressing knowledge deficiencies through education programs.
Hewitt et al., Infant Behavior and Development,  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.infbeh.2017.11.008

Child care centre adherence to infant physical activity and screen time recommendations in Australia, Canada and the United States: An observational study

2018

Adherence to physical activity, screen time, and sedentary behavior recommendations is critical to promoting optimal health among children. The study compared adherence to physical activity, screen time, and sedentary behaviors recommendation. Quantitative since it is a cross-sectional study using data. Data was collected from Australian preschools, studies, and trials.

9 Australian 2013 Standing Preschool, 22 Early Start Baseline studies (2014-2017), and 14 Canadian Healthy Living Habits in Pre-School Children study (2011). Others included the American 2008 (N = 31) and 2013–2017 (N = 31) Baby Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care trials.

The observational study primarily compared data on physical activity, screen time, and sedentary behavior recommendation. Center-level data was collected without any interaction with human subjects. Child care centers compliant with recommendation for promoting physical activity, reducing screen time, and hindering sedentary living were associated with high levels of health standards. Children care centers should be assisted on limiting the use of equipment that restricts movement and education about children’s physical activity to families is important. The study supports the EBP project proposal by affirming the need for education about children’s physical activity to families. A key component of the EBP project proposal is educating parents on increasing physical activity besides regulating screen time.
Eyimaya and Irmak, Journal of Pediatric Nursing,  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pedn.2020.10.002

Relationship Between Parenting Practices and Children’s Screen Time During the COVID-19 Pandemic in Turkey

2020

There is a direct relationship between parents’ practices and children’s screen time. The study investigated the relationship between parenting practices and children’s screen time following the COVID-19 outbreak. Quantitative- it is a cross-sectional study. The study was conducted in three randomly-selected schools in the western, eastern and central regions of Turkey.

1115 parents participated

The data were collected using a descriptive questionnaire form and the Parenting Practices Scale. The online questionnaire was shared with the parents (children aged 6–13 years) between May 15 and 31, 2020. There was a significant rise in the amount of screen time after the amount of time that parents spent at home increased due to lockdown. Parenting practices were found to influence children’s screen time and ground rules are necessary to reduce screen time. Parents need information on setting ground rules for screen time to prevent an increase in screen time as the amount of time spent at home increases. The study supports the EBP project proposal by affirming that parental knowledge affects children’s screen time and regulation is necessary. Therefore, educating parents to set ground rules is pivotal in reducing screen time at home as a practical intervention of reducing childhood obesity.

 

NUR 550 Evidence-Based Practice Project Evaluation of Literature Table

The purpose of this assignment is to provide research evidence in support of the PICOT you developed for your selected topic.

Conduct a search for 10 peer-reviewed, translational research articles published within the last 5 years that demonstrate support for your PICOT. You may include previous research articles from assignments

NUR 550 Evidence-Based Practice Project Evaluation of Literature Table Slayers

NUR 550 Evidence-Based Practice Project Evaluation of Literature Table Slayers

completed in this course. Use the “Literature Evaluation Table” provided to evaluate the articles and explain how the research supports your PICOT.

Once your instructor returns this assignment, review the feedback and make any revisions necessary. If you are directed by your instructor to select different articles in order to meet the assignment criteria or to better support your PICOT, make these changes accordingly. You will use the literature evaluated in this assignment for all subsequent assignments you develop as part of your evidence-based practice project proposal in this course and in NUR-590, during which you will synthesize all of the sections into a final written paper detailing your evidence-based practice project proposal. NUR 550 Evidence-Based Practice Project Evaluation of Literature Table

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Literature Evaluation Table

Learner Name:

PICOT

Author, Journal (Peer-Reviewed), and Permalink or Working Link to Access Article

Article Title and Year Published

Research Questions/ Hypothesis, and Purpose/Aim of Study

Design (Quantitative, Qualitative, or other)

Setting/Sample

Methods: Intervention/ Instruments

Analysis/Data Collection

Outcomes/Key Findings

Recommendations

Explanation of How the Article Supports Your Proposed EBP Practice Project Proposal
Lin et al., Journal of Pediatric Nursing,  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pedn.2020.07.003
Effects of Parental Education on Screen Time, Sleep Disturbances, and Psychosocial Adaptation Among Asian Preschoolers: A Randomized Controlled Study
2021
Parental education and instruction manuals play an instrumental role in reducing screen time among children. The study investigated the effect of parental educational program on screen use, sleep quality, and psychosocial adaptation among preschoolers.
Quantitative- it is an observational study.
The study was conducted in Chiayi, Taiwan from April to December 2018. 129 parent-child dyads participated in the study.
The experimental group (N=63 dyads) received parental education and the control group (N=66) performed daily activities.
Data was collected before and after the intervention and a liner mixed-model analysis conducted to examine the intervention’s efficacy.
The screen time in the intervention group was significantly reduced and they presented improved sleep quality and attention score for psychosocial adaptation.
Parental education was recommended as an effective intervention for reducing screen time and improving sleep quality and attention among preschoolers.
The study supports the EBP project proposal by confirming the critical role of educational interventions in reducing screen time.

https://allnursingessays.com/nur-550-evidence-based-practice-project-evaluation-of-literature-table/
Joseph et al., Global Pediatric Health,  https://doi.org/10.1177%2F2333794X19865856
Young Children’s Screen Time and Physical Activity: Perspectives of Parents and Early Care and Education Center Providers
2019
Caregivers’ lack of awareness of physical activity and screen time guidelines affects their participation in promoting behaviors that reduce childhood obesity.

The study investigated how early care and education providers and parents can facilitate physical activity and reduce screen time in children, with particular attention on preschoolers.
Qualitative- conducted focus groups and thematic analysis.
The research was conducted in ECE centers of a selected parish of a southeastern US state. 28 caregivers participated in the study.
Four focus groups were conducted (3 parent and 1 ECE provider)
Demographics, accelerometry data, and screen time habits of children were collected at home and ECE centers before and after implementing new guidelines.
The groups differed in their view regarding screen time as an entertainment or educational tool and the time limit appropriate for children. Parents and ECE providers were found to lack awareness of physical activity or screen time guidelines.
The research recommended the need for improved awareness on screen time and physical activity guidelines. It also recommends investigation into opportunities to utilize screen time effectively.
The qualitative research supports the EBP project proposal by showing the need for increasing awareness in parents regarding screen time and physical activity guidelines.
Goncalves et al. (2019). International Journal of Behavior Nutrition and Physical Activity, https://dx.doi.org/10.1186%2Fs12966-019-0788-3
Parental influences on screen time and weight status among preschool children from Brazil: a cross-sectional study.
2019
The study hypothesized that parental attributes and parental screen time behaviors proportionately affect preschoolers’ screen time and weight status. The study examined the relationships between parental screen time, parental self-efficacy to limit screen time, child screen time and child BMI in preschool-aged children.
It is quantitative design since it is a cross-sectional study.
The study took place in seven Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) centers in Caruaru – Pernambuco, Brazil.

318 parent-child dyads participated in the study.
The 318 parent-child dyads who participated in the study completed a survey measuring sociodemographic data, weekday and weekend screen time, and parental self-efficacy for limiting screen time.
Height and weight were collected using standardized WHO measurement procedures. Observed variable path analysis was used to evaluate the relationships between the parental and child variables.
Greater child screen time was associated with higher child BMI percentile. Parental screen time and self-efficacy to limit screen time emerged as influences towards child screen time and weight status.
Parents should understand the need to reduce screen time. Reducing parental screen time and increasing parental confidence to limit screen time may be effective strategy to prevent overweight.
The study supports the proposed EBP project by confirming the role of parental knowledge in modeling children’s behavior. It advocates for the need to increase parents knowledge to enable them regulate self- and children’s screen time to reduce overweight problems.
Pearson et al., BMC Public Health, https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-020-8232-9
Reducing screen-time and unhealthy snacking in 9–11 year old children: the Kids FIRST pilot randomized controlled trial.
2020
The study hypothesized that increasing parent-and home-focused interventions can change multiple health behaviors in children. The study evaluated the effectiveness of the Kids FIRST project, a randomized controlled trial to reduce screen time and unhealthy snacking.
Quantitative- a randomized controlled trial.
The Kids FIRST program was family based with a school component in East Midlands region of the United Kingdom.

Children- 407, parents- 75, in 4 schools.
The randomized controlled trial to reduce screen time and unhealthy snacking had pre- and post-intervention assessments. Baseline and post-intervention data was compared.
Children and parents reported (full questionnaire data) their own screen-time behaviors as children went further to report snacking behaviors. Descriptive analysis was undertaken intending to treat.
Reductions in children’s school day and weekend day TV viewing and computer game use were associated with healthy behaviors in children.
The study recommended more parental engagement in controlling screen time and unhealthy snacking as a parent- and home-focused intervention to promote healthy behaviors in children.
The study supports the EBP project proposal by recommending the need for more parental engagement in regulating children behavior in early stages. Educating parents will enable them to embrace this role to become more active in regulating screen time as a home-focused intervention to reduce childhood obesity.
Tester et al., Pediatrics, https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2017-3228
Characteristics of Children 2 to 5 Years of Age With Severe Obesity
2018
Children with severe obesity have not been extensively described and more than the recommended screen time limit is a trigger of severe obesity.
Quantitative design- the study classifies and evaluates sociodemographic data, birth characteristics, and screen time, among other factors.
Children from NHANES, a complex, multistage probability cross-sectional sample designed to be representative of the US civilian, non-institutionalized population, participated.

N= 7028
Children were classified as having normal weight, overwe

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